Rejection. Losing. Failure.

Nobody strives for them. No athlete sets out for last place, no entrepreneur’s goal is bankruptcy.

But as if an act of divine mercy, there’s positives to be found in the negatives. In fact, it’s almost gospel the extent we hear successful people preaching the value in failing.

Denis Waitley said it well:

“Failure should be our teacher, not our undertaker. Failure is delay, not defeat. It is a temporary detour, not a dead end. Failure is something we can avoid only by saying nothing, doing nothing, and being nothing.”

Successful people lick their wounds but never leave the battlefield, they turn their scars into strengths.

In approaching rejection, losing and failure, here are 10 hidden blessings:

1. You’ll Clarify Your Passions

Many of us struggle with decision making. Those with creative energy typically have their hand in multiple pies. But even a jack-of-all-trades knows there’s a limit to how thin you can spread yourself.

Often, failure and losing result from diminished passion. You realize you weren’t as passionate about that project as first thought. The pruning effect is a positive. As you clear your plate a little, the things that are left are what really gets you excited, and you direct your energy toward them.

Focused energy is when you’re most effective, failure gets rid of fluff.

2. You’ll Uncover New Skills

Remember when George Bush nimbly dodged that shoe destined for his head? Nobody thought he had the skill to do that. And I suspect neither did he. Until that moment.

Facing challenges and enduring a loss causes us to gather up resources and develop skills beyond our arsenal. In cases of “hysterical strength,” where ordinary people lift cars off someone trapped, it’s the negative situation that produces the surge of adrenaline and an act beyond one’s capability.

Negative experiences cause us to respond in ways beyond what we thought possible. The obstacle beckons to be overcome. In order to rise to the occasion, there needs to be an occasion.

3. You’ll Find Out Who Your Friends Are

Take a spill and you’ll see who emerges out of the Facebook crowd to lift you up. Sure, everyone’s busy, but we make time for the things we value and care about. “I’m too busy” can be translated, “It’s not that important.”

Relationships are crucial in life, they take a lot of work and time invested—you don’t want to be investing in bad stock. Of course friendships aren’t to be boiled down to a shallow transaction, but unfortunately, some folks see them that way— a lot of taking without any giving. It’s these relationships that need severing. There’s no honor, or sense, in helping others when you’re hurting yourself.

Hitting rock bottom uncovers the healthy relationships from the detrimental. You’ll want to keep investing in those who are nursing your wounds, and distance yourself from the silent and nowhere to be seen.

4. You’ll Check Your Blind Spots

It only takes one accident for a driver never to forget checking their blind spot again. A harsh way to learn, but some changes in behavior only happen with such shocks to the system.

While there are habits and skills we’ve not yet acquired, failures remind us of the ones we do possess, but simply lazy in doing. After suffering a robbery, you’ll never forget to lock the screen door again.

5. You’ll Burn Away Pride and Arrogance

Nobody is immune to pride and arrogance. To say you’re beyond pride and arrogance is a little… well… prideful and arrogant. Losing is the glass of water for that bitter pill of pride. But that unpleasant process gives birth to humility. Which is perhaps the most attractive and profitable virtue anyone can possess.

As the proverb goes, “Pride goeth before the fall;” rejection and loss exchanges pride for humility, and may be the savior that prevents your fall.

6. You’ll Grow Elephant Skin

The shins of Muay Thai fighters can break baseball bats. The micro-fractures from hours upon hours of kicking heavy bags are filled with calcium, resulting in abnormal bone density. It’s just as muscle fibers grow as a result of micro-tears in the gym.

The old adage rings true—it’s the pain that brings the gain. The healing of a fracture carries a gift. 101-advice for anyone stepping out to pursue their dream is prepare for rejection, criticism and haters. And with each punch thrown your way, you’ll realize that you can’t please everyone, and the impact will start to soften. You’ll even learn to bob and weave, realizing the issue lies more with them than with you.

7. You’ll Never Wonder “What If?” Again

The question of “What if?” can cause hours on end staring out the window. When that curiosity is pursued only to find you’ve boarded the wrong plane, failure is the blessing that pulls you right off. You’ll no longer be kept up at night wondering about that other option.

Curiosity can cripple our consciousness and distracts from the work we should be doing. But sometimes engaging your own nagging is the only way to silence it.

Seeing his father drink beer, a teenage Tony Robbins begged his mother to let him try. Not only did she let him try, she gave him a whole six-pack, and wouldn’t let him leave until he drank every drop. Tony has never touched alcohol since. The taste of his own vomit may have something to do with that.

8. You’ll Finally Ask For Help

Anyone with passion and ambition is tragically plagued with superhero-syndrome, which is both helpful, and harmful; particularly when the candle is burning at both ends, and you’re drifting toward burnout.

When the word “help” disappears from our vocabulary, it’s found when we crash and burn. We realize the skill of delegation is critical for our health and progress. We need to move away from viewing help negatively as a form of weakness, to positively—that our success is growing beyond our own capacity.

9. You’ll Go To The Drawing Board

And you’ll engage in iteration. The process of reevaluating and refining, which produces a better end-result. As the saying goes, “Why fix it if it ain’t broke?” Some things need fixing, but reevaluation doesn’t happen if something doesn’t break.

No doubt one of the greatest human achievements: 110-mile swim from Cuba to Florida without a shark cage. The only individual in the world to accomplish that feat—64-year old Diana Nyad. She was on her fifth attempt, her first attempt back in 1978 and three other attempts from 2011 – 2012.

Her last attempt was cut short with jellyfish stings that left her face puffed and swollen. This time, she wore a full bodysuit, gloves, and a mask at night—when jellyfish rise to the surface.

She failed, went back to the drawing board, made iterations, and succeeded.

10. You’ll Appreciate Your Success

Value and meaning become heightened in the face of difficulty. The greatest celebrations come from the toughest battles. You’ll realize the dream isn’t all rainbows and butterflies.

When the journey includes getting back on your feet and dusting yourself off, you’ll be more inclined to stop when you see roses, and express a little more gratitude and appreciation at the finish line.

Among the 14 “Eight-Thousanders” on earth, few recognize Kangchenjunga—while Everest is a household name. There’s only 262 meters separating the two mountains, but it’s the failures and deaths on Everest that make it the most respected and celebrated climb.

The bitterness of every failure adds sweetness to every victory.

-Addicted to Success –

Thai Nguyen

September 17, 2014 marks 5 years since, personal development giant, Jim Rohn passed away. Here are some of his unforgettable quotes;

1. “Don’t wish it was easier, wish you were better. Don’t wish for less problems, wish for more skills. Don’t wish for less challenge, wish for more wisdom.”

2. “The challenge of leadership is to be strong, but not rude; be kind, but not weak; be bold, but not a bully; be thoughtful, but not lazy; be humble, but not timid; be proud, but not arrogant; have humor, but without folly.”

3. “We must all suffer one of two things: the pain of discipline or the pain of regret.”

4. “Days are expensive. When you spend a day you have one less day to spend. So make sure you spend each one wisely.”

5. “Discipline is the bridge between goals and accomplishment.”

6. “If you are not willing to risk the unusual, you will have to settle for the ordinary.”

7. “Motivation is what gets you started. Habit is what keeps you going.”

8. “Success is nothing more than a few simple disciplines, practiced every day.”

9. “Don’t join an easy crowd; you won’t grow. Go where the expectations and the demands to perform are high.”

10. “Learn how to be happy with what you have while you pursue all that you want.” 

The worst kept secret is that employees are making less on average every year. There are millions of reasons for this, but we’re going to focus on one that we can control.  Staying employed at the same company for over two years on average is going to make you earn less over your lifetime by about 50% or more.

Keep in mind that 50% is a conservative number at the lowest end of the spectrum.  This is assuming that your career is only going to last 10 years.  The longer you work, the greater the difference will become over your lifetime.

Arguments for Changing Jobs

The average raise an employee can expect in 2014 is 3%. Even the most underperforming employee can expect a 1.3% raise. The best performers can hope for a 4.5% raise.  But, the inflation rate is currently 2.1% calculated based on the Consumer Price Index published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. This means that your raise is actually less than 1%.  This is probably sobering enough to make you reach for a drink.

In 2014, the average employee is going to earn less than a 1% raise and there is very little that we can do to change management’s decision. But, we can decide whether we want to stay at a company that is going to give us a raise for less than 1%. The average raise an employee receives for leaving is between a 10% to 20% increase in salary. Obviously, there are extreme cases where people receive upwards of 50%, but this depends on each person’s individual circumstances and industries.

Assumes your career will last 10 years. An avg 3% raise and a conservative 10% raise per transition.

Why are people who jump ship rewarded, when loyal employees are punished for their dedication? The answer is simple. Recessions allow businesses to freeze their payroll and decrease salaries of the newly hired based on “market trends.” These reactions to the recession are understandable, but the problem is that these reactions were meant to be “temporary.” Instead they have become the “norm” in the marketplace. More importantly, we have all become used to hearing about “3% raises” and we’ve accepted it as the new “norm.”

John Hollon, former editor of Workforce.com, remembers when “5% was considered an average annual pay increase.” The amount of fear the media created surrounding the recession and its length has given companies the perfect excuse to shrink payroll and lower employee salary expectations in the long-run.

The world is desperate for skilled labor and companies around the globe are starving for talent.  Companies can tout technology replacing labor, but it is only exacerbating the global shortage of human capital and skilled workers. This means that we as employees are positioned better than ever to leverage our abilities for increased pay.

Bethany Devine, a Senior Hiring Manager in Silicon Valley, CA who has worked withIntuit and other Fortune 500 companies explains, “I would often see resumes that only had a few years at each company. I found that the people who had switched companies usually commanded a higher salary. The problem with staying at a company forever is you start with a base salary and usually annual raises are based on a percentage of your current salary. There is often a limit to how high your manager can bump you up since it’s based on a percentage of your current salary. However, if you move to another company, you start fresh and can usually command a higher base salary to hire you. Companies competing for talent are often not afraid to pay more when hiring if it means they can hire the best talent. Same thing applies for titles. Some companies have a limit to how many promotions they allow each year. Once you are entrenched in a company, it may become more difficult to be promoted as you may be waiting in line behind others who should have been promoted a year ago but were not due to the limit. However, if you apply to another company, your skills may match the higher title, and that company will hire you with the new title. I have seen many coworkers who were waiting on a certain title and finally received it the day they left and were hired at a new company.”

Even more importantly, when I asked Devine her thoughts on employees who had remained in the same company for periods long past the two year mark, she explained that she did feel that some were “underpaid” or had the potential to earn more.

Jessica Derkis started her career earning $8 per hour ($16,640 annual salary) as the YMCA’s marketing manager.  Over 10 years, she’s changed employers five times to ultimately earn $72,000 per year at her most recent marketing position.  This is approximately a 330% increase over a 10 year career.  Derkis’ most recent transition resulted in a 50% increase to her salary.  Derkis’ is a great example of how “owning your career” can make a huge difference in your income and career path.

Arguments Against Changing Jobs

People are worried that “changing jobs too often” will reflect negatively on employee resumes. I can definitely understand this fear because everyone is always worried about being unmarketable. I will be the first to admit that it is possible that certain employers may look at a resume with multiple transitions as a negative and may even disqualify an applicant based on that alone.

But, the important question is whether the risk outweighs the reward. Christine Mueller, President of TechniSearch Recruiters, has had clients that “will not consider anyone who has had more than three jobs in the last 10 years, no matter the reason.” Even so, Mueller still recommends that an employee makes a transition every three to four years for maximum salary gains.  Thus, the question is less about whether employees should jump ship, but how long they should they wait before jumping to maximize their salaries and achieve their goals.

Brendan Burke, Director at Headwaters MB, strongly disagrees with the “up-and-out culture.”  He explains that “companies turn over great employees because they’re not organizationally strong enough to support rapid development within their ranks. In many cases, that is a recipe for discontinuity in service and product offerings as well as disloyalty in the ranks. As such, we take the opposite approach. Rather than force folks out after 24 months, we try to retain our junior and mid-level staff and develop them within the ranks.”

Mr. Burke is absolutely correct. Most companies are not equipped to “rapidly” promote and reward their best employees for a variety of reasons such as office politics. Everyone that has worked in the labor pool hates office politics, but understands that it is an unavoidable evil and is more often than not a major obstacle to rewarding talent.

Finally, we’ve been talking about money a lot.  Andrew Bauer, CEO of Royce Leather, explains that jumping ship can be “stressful.” Employees also need to consider their “quality of life, mental health, physical health and better moral standards.” Mr. Bauer is right. Money is important, but it must be balanced with everything else in your life. Monetary compensation is only one part of your life, and it should not dictate everything.

Jumping ship is a risk that we all need to weigh at a personal level.  In my career, jumping ship is something I’ve done aggressively and frequently. I’ve never looked back and regretted my decisions because I’ve always felt that my skills deserved more. Hiring a single employee who is able to perform even 10% more efficiently is worth at least a 25% increase in salary. Companies spend a lot of money to pay recruiters, human resourcing to conduct background checks and the time of existing employees to hire and train new people. It’s always cheaper to just hire better people and pay them more.

Conclusion:

It’s a fact that employees are underpaid. Instead of focusing on things we can’t control like the economy or management decisions, focus on the things we can. Employees can control their own salaries by aggressively negotiating their opportunities and being unafraid to ask for more.

Clearly, there will always be exceptions to the rule. Not everyone may be able to make this decision immediately, but every employee should consider the option. I don’t fault employers and businesses for the market because it’s their right and duty to maximize their profits. But,  as an individual, you’re a CEO of one, and you have a duty to maximize your profits.

Cameron Keng – Forbes

Many people want to be financially independent to do whatever they want, whenever they want with whomever they want but only a few of them become so.

So if you are one of them, let me give you 6 reasons why you are still not financially independent.

#1 You think it’s impossible

I spoke with many people about financial independence and each one of them completely agrees on the fact that financial independence is great.

Not worrying about money, travelling wherever we want, buying whatever we want without feeling guilty…is something many people want but only a few of them will ever achieve simply because they will tell themselves:

“Stop dreaming! That’s not going to happen, that’s too good to be true…”

Which boils down to:

“That’s impossible”

That belief is what prevents most people from ever reaching financial independence because if they believe something is impossible they won’t take any action. They won’t read any book about finance, they won’t attend seminars, they won’t interview people who are already financially independent, which is necessary to become financially independent.

#2 You don’t have any plan

If you say that one day you’ll be financially independent make sure you have a plan. Having a strong desire to get something is not enough, you need to implement strategies otherwise that’s just dreaming.

So can you tell me what is your plan for the next 5 years? What will you implement exactly in the future to reach your financial independence?

If you can’t answer both questions, finish reading this article and start writing down your plan. I don’t want you to procrastinate! If you tell me that you’ll make it tomorrow you won’t do it. So start making a plan and stick to it!

See also: Reach any goal with that simple trick

 

#3 You spend all your pay immediately

Don’t be like 80% of people; pay yourself first! That’s the rule n°1. No matter what you’ve read so far about wealth creation or financial independence saving money must be your priority.

So what do I mean by paying yourself first? “Paying yourself first means that every time you get any income you want to immediately put 10% of your money aside (on another account for example). Before paying any rent, any taxes, any loan, food, clothes…”

 

#4 You take advice

This point is also really important. A lot of people who want to become financially independent take advice from other people around them. That’s a big mistake so if you do it, stop it now.

When you take advice from your friends, family, colleagues…you won’t get any benefits, unless they achieved what you want. The only thing they will give you is thousands of reasons not to invest, not to undertake, not to do this or that. They will hold you back with their fears and expectations.

Only take advice from people who already have the result you want to get!

 

#5 You don’t make sacrifices

We tend to think that financial independence is something that we will get with time and patience. Time and patience are necessary of course but a lot of efforts are required too.

You need to make some sacrifices! I know when you come back from work or school you’re tired and the only thing you want is lay down on your sofa and watch TV, go on Facebook or watch videos of cute cats on Internet.

If you want to be financially independent forget all of that and read books and watch educational videos about what you want to achieve for example.

You need to get your head right if you want to create wealth. That’s a part of the sacrifices you need to make.

With time you’ll see that you will enjoy it. Reading books will be almost like seeing money coming in into your bank account. But if you notice that after reading 1 or 2 books you don’t enjoy the time you spend getting educated on that topic, you should forget about becoming wealthy. Because what’s the point of becoming financially independent if you don’t like the process involved?

 

#6 You are not grateful

You need to recognize the wealth you already have. Be grateful for being alive, for having a family, friends…if you are not, financial independence will bring you nothing. Don’t think that money will bring you happiness. If you don’t see the beauty in your life today, you won’t see it tomorrow with $1billion.

One day an expert in time management was speaking to a group of business students and, to drive home a point, used an illustration those students will never forget. As he stood in front of the group of high powered overachievers he said, “Okay, time for a quiz.” Then he pulled out a one-gallon, wide mouthed Mason jar and set on the table in front of him. He then produced about a dozen fist sized rocks and carefully placed them, one at a time, into the jar.  When the jar was filled to the top and no more rocks would fit inside, he asked, “Is the jar full?” Everyone in the class said, “Yes.”  Then he said, “Really?” He reached under the table and pulled out a bucked of gravel.  Then he dumped some gravel in and shook the jar causing pieces of gravel to work themselves down into the space between the big rocks.  Then he asked the group once more, “Is the jar full?”

By this time the class was on to him.  “Probably not,” one of them answered. “Good!” he replied. He reached under the table and brought out a bucket of sand. He started dumping the sand in the jar and it went into all the spaces left between the rocks and the gravel. Once more he asked the question, “Is the jar full?” “No!” the class shouted.  Once again he said, “Good!” Then he grabbed a pitcher of water and began t0 pour it in until the jar was filled to the brim.  Then he looked at the class and asked, “What is the point of this illustration?”

One eager student raised his hand and said, “The point is, no matter how full your schedule is, if you try really hard you can always fit some more things in!” “No,” the speaker replied, “That’s not the point. The truth this illustration teaches us is:  If you don’t put the big rocks in first, you’ll never get them in at all.  What are the ‘big rocks’ in your life? Your children….Your loved ones….Your education….Your dreams… A worthy cause….Teaching or mentoring others…Doing things that you love….Time for yourself….Your health….Your significant other.”

“Remember to put these BIG ROCKS in first or you’ll never get them in at all.  If you sweat the little stuff (the gravel,the sand) then you’ll fill your life with little things to worry about that doesn’t really matter, and you’ll never have the real quality time you need to spend on the big, important stuff (the big rocks).  So, tonight or in the morning, when you are reflecting on this short story, ask yourself this question: What are the ‘big rocks’ in my life?  Then, put those in your jar first.”

“Life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting
‘What a ride’.” -Unknown-


I have always been one to push myself. 18 holes are not enough. Most warm days I find a way to play 36 and smack around 3 or 4 hundred balls.

In the winter I practice yoga, ski, lift weights and find a way to slip in 72 or so holes a week. I’ll read a book or two, Oh and when I’m bored I’ll throw some work in as well. Why sit around? There will be lots of time for rest when I stop inhaling and exhaling.

Here’s my 2 cents on staying young…

  • Throw out nonessential numbers. This includes age, weight and height. Let the doctors worry about that, isn’t that why we pay them?
  • Keep only cheerful friends. The grouches pull you down.
  • Keep learning! Learn more about computers, crafts, gardening, whatever, even ham radio. Never let the brain idle. “An idle mind is the devil’s workshop”, and the devil’s family name is Alzheimer’s.
  • Enjoy the simple things.
  • Laugh often, long and loud. Laugh until you gasp for breath.
  • The tears happen. Endure, grieve, and move on. The only person, who is with us our entire life, is ourselves. Be ALIVE while you are alive. 
  • Surround yourself with what you love, whether it’s family, pets, keepsakes, music, plants, hobbies, whatever. Your home is your refuge.
  • Cherish your health: If it is good, preserve it. If it is unstable, improve it. If it is beyond what you can improve, get help. Practice Yoga! You will just last longer!
  • Don’t take guilt trips… Take a trip to the mall, even to the next county; to a foreign country but NOT to where the guilt is.
  • Tell the people you love that you love them, at every opportunity.

AND ALWAYS REMEMBER: Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away. And if you don’t send this to at least 8 people – who cares? But do share this with someone. We all need to live life to its fullest each day!!

George Carlin’s Views on Aging

Do you realize that the only time in our lives when we like to get old is when we’re kids? If you’re less than 10 years old, you’re so excited about aging that you think in fractions. ‘How old are you?’ ‘I’m four and a half!’ You’re never thirty-six and a half. You’re four and a half, going on five! That’s the key.

You get into your teens, now they can’t hold you back. You jump to the next number, or even a few ahead. ‘How old are you?’ ‘I’m gonna be 16!’ You could be 13, but hey, you’re gonna be 16! And then the greatest day of your life! You become 21. Even the words sound like a ceremony. YOU BECOME 21. YESSSS!!!

But then you turn 30. Oooohh, what happened there? Makes you sound like bad milk! He TURNED; we had to throw him out. There’s no fun now, you’re Just a sour-dumpling… What’s wrong?

What’s changed? You BECOME 21, you TURN 30, then you’re PUSHING 40. Whoa! Put on the brakes, it’s all slipping away.

Before you know it, you REACH 50 and your dreams are gone. But! Wait!! ! You MAKE it to 60. You didn’t think you would! So you BECOME 21, TURN 30, PUSH 40, and REACH 50 and make it to 60.

You’ve built up so much speed that you HIT 70! After that it’s a day-by-day thing; you HIT Wednesday! You get into! your 80’s and every day is a complete cycle; you HIT lunch; you TURN 4:30; you REACH bedtime. And it doesn’t end there. Into the 90s, you start going backwards; ‘I Was JUST 92.’Then a strange thing happens. If you make it over 100, you become a little kid again. ‘I’m 100 and a half!’

May you all make it to a healthy 100 and a half!!

Don’t Follow The Follower

Processionary caterpillars travel in long, undulating lines, one creature behind the other. Jean Hanri Fabre, the French entomologist, once lead a group of these caterpillars onto the rim of a large flowerpot so that the leader of the procession found himself nose to tail with the last caterpillar in the procession, forming a circle without end or beginning.

Through sheer force of habit and, of course, instinct, the ring of caterpillars circled the flowerpot for seven days and seven nights, until they died from exhaustion and starvation. An ample supply of food was close at hand and plainly visible, but it was outside the range of the circle, so the caterpillars continued along the beaten path.

People often behave in a similar way. Habit patterns and ways of thinking become deeply established, and it seems easier and more comforting to follow them than to cope with change, even when that change may represent freedom, achievement, and success.

If someone shouts, “Fire!” it is automatic to blindly follow the crowd, and many thousands have needlessly died because of it. How many stop to ask themselves: Is this really the best way out of here?

So many people “miss the boat” because it’s easier and more comforting to follow – to follow without questioning the qualifications of the people just ahead – than to do some independent thinking and checking.

A hard thing for most people to fully understand is that people in such numbers can be so wrong, like the caterpillars going around and around the edge of the flowerpot, with life and food just a short distance away. If most people are living that way, it must be right, they think. But a little checking will reveal that throughout all recorded history the majority of mankind has an unbroken record of being wrong about most things, especially important things. For a time we thought the earth was flat and later we thought the sun, stars, and planets traveled around the Earth. Both ideas are now considered ridiculous, but at the time they were believed and defended by the vast majority of followers. In the hindsight of history we must have looked like those caterpillars blindly following the follower out of habit rather than stepping out of line to look for the truth.

It’s difficult for people to come to the understanding that only a small minority of people ever really get the word about life, about living abundantly and successfully. Success in the important departments of life seldom comes naturally, no more naturally than success at anything – a musical instrument, sports, fly-fishing, tennis, golf, business, marriage, parenthood.

But for some reason most people wait passively for success to come to them – like the caterpillars going around in circles, waiting for sustenance, following nose to tail – living as other people are living in the unspoken, tacit assumption that other people know how to live successfully.

It’s a good idea to step out of the line every once in a while and look around to see if the line is going where we want it to go. If it is not, it might be time for a new leader and a new direction.

For those who have tried repeatedly to break a habit of some kind, only to repeatedly fail, Mary Pickford said, “Falling is not failing, unless you fail to get up.” Most people who finally win the battle over a habit they have wanted to change have done so only after repeated failures. And it’s the same with most things.

The breaking of a long-time habit does seem like the end of the road at the time – the complete cessation of enjoyment. Suddenly dropping the habit so fills our minds with the desire for the old habitual way that, for a while, it seems there will no longer be any peace, any sort of enjoyment. But that’s not true. New habits form in a surprisingly short time, and a whole new world opens up to us.

So, if you’ve been trying to start in a new direction, you might do well to remember the advice of Mary Pickford: breaking an old habit isn’t the end of the road; it’s just a bend in the road. And falling isn’t failing, unless you don’t get up.

Earl Nightingale

From: The essence of success

Custer being offered machine gun

With the economy plummeting at a records pace, I know how this salesman feels. I know a better way! Custer, a successful soldier has found himself in un-chartered territory and way out numbered. Under conditions he was used to fighting he would have been able to accept a victory. So in this cartoon it looks as though instead of taking time to listen to an alternative he just wants to continue the only way he knows how, by charging forward to his death.

Over the past few months I have felt like this salesman on several occasions. Our company is setting and breaking sales record after sales record, and making millionaire distributors at the pace of one every 9 days. Thousands of people are just saying “NO” to the recession. Even though you may have been successful in business and everyday life over the years, the times are changing. To keep up with this new economy it is time for a paradigm shift in your career plans. Have an open mind and you might just do more than survive.

10. Yoga classes are mostly women, guys are out numbered 7 to 1!
Oh come on, I know you were thinking it too.

9. It seems the coolest people in the world practice yoga.

With yoga leading to harmony in our relationships it brings out our best qualities, which make it much easier to power through a 6 am practice.

8. Yoga improves Concentration and Mental Clarity

Hone the mind and intellect through yoga. You can say I have become one with the force, like a Jedi Knight.

7. Yoga benefits my Mental Health too
Peace of mind! Mind has become an ever-elusive goal in today’s fast-paced world. This is where my stellar golf game comes from (that’s my story and I’m sticking to it).

6. Yoga is the ultimate tool for Self Improvement
A wise yogi used to tell his students, “You don’t have a problem. You are the problem!” Yoga teaches us that we are each responsible for everything that happens to us, and it gives us the training to improve all of our life situations…
I’m just trying to keep that part from my wife.

5. Energy, Vitality and Longevity are all benefits of yoga
Yoga not only improves health, but it improves quality of life and lifespan too! Gain vigor and vitality through yoga. It’s kind of like Viagra for the soul.

4. Yoga remedies many diseases and health problems
Studies have shown that yoga helps to reduce blood pressure and hearth disease. It has proven beneficial for those suffering from diabetes, arthritis, digestive problems, asthma and more… Unfortunately, it won’t make the hair on my head grow.

3. Improved Breathing is an important benefit of yoga
Proper breathing is the cornerstone of good health. But I still prefer to cruise the courses in my cart.

2. You can’t beat yoga for Stress Relief

Yoga is one of the best practices for calming the nerves and reducing anxiety. It’s my little happy place. Think Happy Gilmore!

1. Yoga Health Benefits are vast indeed
Yoga helps normalize blood pressure. It relieves muscle tension and improves flexibility. It strengthens muscles and tones the nervous system Yoga benefits spinal health. Yoga provides great conditioning for weight loss
… And the list goes on.
Basically it gives me the energy and vitality to enjoy the good things in life, including keep up with my girls on the slopes!

I have a friend that I nick named the Hobbit. I have learned a lot about life style from my good friend the Hobbit. He is truly free, free from what other people think and do.  He has taught me to be audacious, keen, and to truly live everyday as though it were my last. The hobbit is just a solid and trustworthy guy.

With financial freedom and copious amounts of free time over the last few years, he and I have played thousands of rounds of golf.  It has been a blast. Times like these are truly something I hold sacred.

Character is learned by good example. Good Character takes a life time to develop and a minute to lose. I hope you are all fortunate enough to find a friend that inspires you the way the Hobbit has
inspired me. Here is a very rare picture of this mystical creature in his natural habitat while at the Entrada Country Club in St. George, Utah. I’m sure the Hobbit has moved on by now.

The Hobbit

My home in Entrada

My home in Entrada

The Hobbit at Entrada Country club